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October 13, 2004

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Comments

Donna

While I respect your opinion, I have actually had gastric bypass surgery.

The example you gave of filling a 1/2 cup measuring cup is inaccurate. Before surgery 6 of those 1/2 cups wouldn't begin to make you feel "full", but after 1/2 cup is a lot of food and it registers as a lot of food. I actually eat 1 cup of food at a time, if I can finish it.

Also, the Atkins diet would be a poor choice for a post-op patient because of the fat content. That much fat would most certainly make one fell nauseated and could cause dumping itself. I don't dump on sugar, but it makes me feel unwell, (as does high fat food), so I do not crave them like I used to, even on a low carb diet. Also, my diabetes hasn't had to be treated since the day I had my surgery. I still needed medication while eat low carb prior to surgery.

Surgery should never be taken lightly, it is to be considered a last resort. But, I would rather die trying than stay morbidly obese and die from that! I have never had so much energy and felt better in my entire life!

I wish you all the best with your low carb path.

Donna

Dieting-Home

Today we issued the second press release in our Hitwise Holiday Series, highlighting the fact that search is driving 48% of visits to the top recipe sites as we approach Thanksgiving. I decided to take this opportunity to pull out one of my favorite charts that demonstrates the trade- off between searches for Thanksgiving Day recipes and visits to the major online dieting sites...

Peggy Lee Maxwell

I have had the gastric bypass surgery and can honestly say I was very sucessful with it I have lost 297 pounds since 1996. The difficulties I have found with having this for such a long term, is the food limitations still, and the long term effects of not being able to consume enough vitamins. For example green leafy vegetables are still a big issue after all these years. I have tried puree' but a salad just isnt the same once it hits the blender. ANyway I believe in the surgery and I am a sucess story....but I was fortunate because the doctor that did the bariatric proceedure here was thourough with pre surgery training and theory classes, and advised us how to make the lifestyle changes that make this surgery worth having.

sharon

I just had Gastric Bypass surgery on May 18th 2010 and I weighed 287 at my pre-op appt.nine days after my surgery I weighed 252 so I lost 35 lbs,and am feeling good I do have more energy and am excited that I can see the weight coming off,I have noticed it mostly in my face,hands and stomach,even my family and friends can see the change in me,I will post back in a month.

Michelle

It is NOT true that everyone who has gastric bypass cannot tolerate fats! I am doing Atkins as my post-op lifestyle, and I have no problem with fat. I feel great! I have no regrets for having GBS. I lost 150 lbs that I would NOT have lost without the surgery, even if I had been doing Atkins. I needed the restriction. It also gave me the time to make lifestyle changes and figure out why I ate so much in the first place. Now, at 135 lbs, I am able to use the Atkins low-carb lifestyle to maintain my weight loss. And I couldn't be happier! :)

writing a dissertation

I would beg a family member to fully read Atkins, to have the whole household go on Atkins before trying gastric bypass. And this means that the person who does the shopping and the cooking MUST take the time to read all of the Atkins books and the South Beach books and the Protein Power books. The SOS study is the only one we identified that compares the effect on comorbidities between surgically treated patients and a concurrent control group receiving non-surgical treatment.

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